Track Times Today

Tuesday, October 16, 2018
Woodford stallion has 8 winners . . .

    With 2 1/2 months remaining in the battle for various titles, the Florida freshman sire race has more or less sorted itself out. While Stonehedge Farm South's Cajun Breeze and Ocala Stud's Uncaptured began quickly as far as number of winners is concerned, Woodford Thoroughbreds' He's Had Enough and Get Away Farm's Drill have come from behind and moved to the forefront.

    He's Had Enough now leads the way with eight winners, followed by Drill, with six. Pleasant Acres' Handsome Mike has also made a good late run and has five. Uncaptured has four and Cajun Breeze three.

    In the money earned column, however, Uncaptured is still on top with $389,816, mainly due to talented Catherinethegreat ($138,939), but He's Had Enough is striving for that title, too, with $375,132 in the till. Drill is still very much in the hunt with $353,662. The son of Lawyer Ron has the biggest money-winner in the group - two-time stakes-winner Drillit has earned $175,500. Cajun Breeze is not out of it, either, with $311,270 in his bank. 

    BUCCHERO TO PLEASANT ACRES - Two-time Woodford Stakes winner Bucchero will take up residence at Pleasant Acres for the 2019 breeding season as new stallions begin to trickle in to Marion County. Earlier, Neolithic joined the roster, and the new pair make up for the loss of Anthony's Cross, who has moved to California, and ultra-successful Poseidon's Warrior, now a resident of Kentucky. 

    Bucchero is the first son of former Ocala Stud star Kantharos to go to stud, and he'll stand for $5,000. He's still campaigning, and is being pointed for the Breeders' Cup Turf Sprint at Churchill Downs on Nov. 3.

    Other new stallions imported thus far for 2019 are Ami's Flatter and Girvin at Ocala Stud, and Wait, at Arindel Farm.   

    

 

Saturday, October 13, 2018
Open sessions up 22.5 percent . . .


    Hip No.  677, a son of City Zip consigned by Summerfield (Francis & Barbara Vanlangendonck), Agent, was sold for $95,000 to Tracy Farmer to top the second and final Open session of the Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company’s October Yearling Sale. The dark bay or brown colt, out of Prettyatthetable, by Point Given, is a half -brother to graded stakes-winning OBS Yearling Sale graduate Pomeroy’s Pistol.

    Hip No. 648, a chestnut colt by Giant Surprise consigned by Kelli Mitchell, Agent, went to Bladen Bloodstock for $75,000. He’s out of stakes-placed No Mo Magic, by Mo Mon, a half-sister to stakes-winner At the Disco.

    Hip No. 565, a daughter of Uncaptured also consigned by Summerfield, was sold to S G V Thoroughbreds LLC for $72,000. The bay filly is out of Jim’s Lonesa, by Put It Back, a half-sister to stakes-winner Who What Win.

    Summerfield also consigned Hip No. 603, a son of Kantharos purchased by W.D. North Thoroughbreds LLC for $72,000. The bay colt is out of Luca’s Lady, by Hold Me Back, a half-sister to stakes-placed Jet Majesty.

    Champion Equine LLC paid $72,000 for Hip No. 756, a son of Central Banker consigned by Beth Bayer, Agent. The bay colt is out of stakes-placed Spirit of Rose, by City Zip.

    Hip No. 614, a chestnut colt by Kitten’s Joy consigned by Stuart Morris, Agent, went to de Meric Stables, Agent, for $70,000. He’s out of Mayakoba, by War Chant, a half-sister to graded stakes-winner Juniper Pass.

    For the session, 142 yearlings sold for $1,845,400, averaging $12,996 with a $7,500 median figure. The buyback percentage was 25.6%.

    For the two Open sessions, 294 horses sold for $3,870,250, compared with 291 horses selling for $3,126,100 in a single session a year ago. The average was $13,164, up 22.5%, compared with $10,743 in 2017 while the median rose to $7,000 from $5,000 last year.  The buyback percentage was 24%; it was 23.4% in 2017.

    The next item on the OBS agenda is the Day of Racing, set for Tuesday, Nov. 20. The next sale is the Winter Mixed Sale, including the Horses of Racing Age section, scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 29-30. 

City Zip colt tops Open Yearling Sale finale

Tibor/Judit photography

Hip No.  677, a son of City Zip consigned by Summerfield (Francis & Barbara Vanlangendonck), Agent, was sold for $95,000 to Tracy Farmer to top the second and final Open session of the Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company’s 2018 October Yearling Sale. The dark bay or brown colt, out of Prettyatthetable, by Point Given, is a half brother to graded stakes winning OBS Yearling Sale graduate Pomeroy’s Pistol.

Hip No. 648, a chestnut colt by Giant Surprise consigned by Kelli Mitchell, Agent, went to Bladen Bloodstock for $75,000. He’s out of stakes placed No Mo Magic, by Mo Mon, a half sister to stakes winner At the Disco.

Hip No. 565, a daughter of Uncaptured also consigned by Summerfield, was sold to S G V Thoroughbreds LLC for $72,000. The bay filly is out of Jim’s Lonesa, by Put It Back, a half sister to stakes winner Who What Win.

Summerfield also consigned Hip No. 603, a son of Kantharos purchased by W.D. North Thoroughbreds LLC for $72,000. The bay colt is out of Luca’s Lady, by Hold Me Back, a half sister to stakes placed Jet Majesty.

Champion Equine LLC paid $72,000 for Hip No. 756, a son of Central Banker consigned by Beth Bayer, Agent. The bay colt is out of stakes placed Spirit of Rose, by City Zip.

Hip No. 614, a chestnut colt by Kitten’s Joy consigned by Stuart Morris, Agent, went to de Meric Stables, Agent, for $70,000. He’s out of Mayakoba, by War Chant, a half sister to graded stakes winner Juniper Pass.

For the session, 142 yearlings sold for a total of $1,845,400, averaging $12,996 with a $7,500 median figure. The buyback percentage was 25.6%.

For the two Open sessions, 294 horses sold for a total of $3,870,250, compared with 291 horses selling for a total of $3,126,100 in a single session a year ago. The average was $13,164, up 22.5%, compared with $10,743 in 2017 while the median was rose to $7,000 compared to $5,000 last year.  The buyback percentage was 24%; it was 23.4% in 2017.

At Tuesday’s Selected session, 139 horses sold for a total of $5,698,000 compared with 115 yearlings bringing $4,959,400 at the 2017 Selected Sale. The average price was $40,993, compared with $43,125 last year, while the median was $28,000 compared with $30,000 last year. The buyback percentage was 25.3%; it was 33.9% a year ago. Nine horses sold for $100,000 or more compared with six a year ago.

The sale topper was Hip No. 138, a son of Cairo Prince consigned by Stuart Morris, Agent, sold to John C. Oxley for an OBS Yearling Sale record $340,000. The gray or roan colt is out of Minutia, by Concord Point, a half sister to stakes winner Mykindasaint. The price bettered the previous mark of $335,000.

The next item on the OBS agenda is the 2018 OBS Day of Racing, set for Tuesday, November 20. The next sale is the 2019 Winter Mixed Sale, including the Horses of Racing Age section, scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday, January 29 

Thursday, October 11, 2018
Stonestreet pays $190,000 . . .

 

    Hip No. 516, Our Time, a chestnut colt by Kantharos consigned by Summerfield (Francis & Barbara Vanlangendonck), Agent, went to Stonestreet Stables LLC for $190,000 to top the first Open session of the Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company’s 2017 October Yearling Sale. He’s out of Golden Trumpet, by Formal Gold, from the family of Gr. I winner Wilderness Song.

    Hip No. 311, a son of Kitten’s Joy consigned by Woodford Thoroughbreds, Agent, was purchased by Ann Maher-Springman, Agent for Rashed Yousef Bouresly, for $100,000. The dark bay or brown colt, a full brother to stakes-winner Kuwait Currency, is out of Thebignbadestbunny, by Smart Strike.

    Hip No. 341, a son of Mark Valeski consigned by Magnolia Point Thoroughbreds, Agent, went to Tracy Farmer for $85,000. Out of Vindi Princess, by Vindication, the bay colt is a half-brother to stakes-winner Big Drink of Water, who picked up his third stakes victory in the Fitz Dixon Jr. Memorial Stakes at Presque Isle last Thursday.

    Smokey Willow Farm paid $80,000 for Hip No. 458, a son of Cairo Prince consigned by Stephens Thoroughbreds LLC, Agent. The dark bay or brown colt is out of Day of Obligation, by Deputy Minister, from the family of Gr. I stakes-winner Confessional.

    Hip No. 489, a son of The Big Beast consigned by Beth Bayer, Agent, went to S G V Thoroughbreds LLC for $70,000. The bay colt is out of Faith Hall, by High Cotton, a half-sister to graded stakes-placed Show Me the Bling.

    For the session, 143 yearlings sold for $1,967,300, averaging $13,757, with a $7,000 median figure. The buyback percentage was 27%.

    The sale continues Today at noon with Hip No.’s 551 – 789 selling in the second Open session. 

Kantharos colt tops Open Yearling Sale’s opening session

Hip No. 516, Our Time, a chestnut colt by Kantharos consigned by Summerfield (Francis & Barbara Vanlangendonck), Agent, went to Stonestreet Stables LLC for $190,000 to top the first Open session of the Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company’s 2017 October Yearling Sale. He’s out of Golden Trumpet, by Formal Gold, from the family of grade one winner Wilderness Song.

Hip No. 311, a son of Kitten’s Joy consigned by Woodford Thoroughbreds, Agent, was purchased by Ann Maher-Springman, Agent for Rashed Yousef Bouresly, for $100,000. The dark bay or brown colt, a full brother to stakes winner Kuwait Currency, is out of Thebignbadestbunny, by Smart Strike.

Hip No. 341, a son of Mark Valeski consigned by Magnolia Point Thoroughbreds, Agent, went to Tracy Farmer for $85,000. Out of Vindi Princess, by Vindication, the bay colt is a half brother to stakes winner Big Drink of Water, who picked up his third stakes win in the Fitz Dixon, Jr. Memorial Stakes at Presque Isle last Thursday.

Smokey Willow Farm paid $80,000 for Hip No. 458, a son of Cairo Prince consigned by Stephens Thoroughbreds LLC, Agent. The dark bay or brown colt is out of Day of Obligation, by Deputy Minister, from the family of grade one stakes winner Confessional.

Hip No. 489, a son of The Big Beast consigned by Beth Bayer, Agent, went to S G V Thoroughbreds LLC for $70,000. The bay colt is out of Faith Hall, by High Cotton, a half sister to graded stakes placed Show Me the Bling.

For the session, 143 yearlings sold for a total of $1,967,300, averaging $13,757, with a $7,000 median figure. The buyback percentage was 27%.

The sale continues Thursday at 12:00 noon with Hip No.’s 551 – 789 selling in the second Open session. The sale will again be streamed live via the OBS website as well as the DRF, TDN and BloodHorse websites. Current information about OBS sales, consignors and graduates is now also available via social media sites Facebook and Twitter. A link on the homepage directs users to eit

Tuesday, October 9, 2018
Sells for $340,000 . . .

    Hip No. 138, a son of Cairo Prince consigned by Stuart Morris, Agent, was sold to John C. Oxley today for an OBS Yearling Sale record $340,000 to top the Selected Sale of Yearlings. The gray or roan colt is out of Minutia, by Concord Point, a half-sister to stakes-winner Mykindasaint. The price bettered the previous mark of $335,000.

    Stonestreet Stables LLC went to $210,000 for Hip No. 145, a daughter of Uncaptured consigned by Summerfield (Francis & Barbara Vanlangendonck), Agent. The bay filly, a half-sister to stakes-winner It’s High Time, is out of My Rolex, by Proud Accolade.

    Hip No. 128, a son of Commissioner consigned by First Finds, was purchased by de Meric Stables, Agent, for $200,000. The bay colt is out of stakes-winner Lunarlady, by Yes It’s True, a half-sister to graded stakes- winners Lunarpal and Astrology.

    De Meric Stables, Agent for Backstretch Farm, also purchased Hip No. 177, a bay filly by Into Mischief, for $170,000. Consigned by Select Sales, Agent, she’s out of She’s a Rainbow, by Giant’s Causeway, a daughter of stakes-placed Rainbow’s Song.

    Hip No. 36, a son of Kitten’s Joy consigned by Woodford Thoroughbreds, Agent, also went to de Meric Sales, Agent, for $150,000. The dark bay or brown colt, out of Blue Grass Music, by Bluegrass Cat, is a full brother to Henley’s Joy, winner of the Kentucky Downs Juvenile Stakes on Sept. 1 and second by a nose this past Saturday in Keeneland’s Gr. III Bourbon Stakes.

    H. H., Agent, went to $140,000 for Hip No. 69, a daughter of Take Charge Indy consigned by Summerfield. The dark bay or brown filly is out of Divine Heart, by Divine Park, a half-sister to Gr. I stakes-winners Include Me Out and Check the Label.

    Hip No. 192, a daughter of American Pharoah consigned by Taylor Made Sales Agency, Agent, was purchased by First Stop Stable for $130,000. The dark bay or brown filly is out of Toast to Ashley, by First Defence, a half-sister to stakes-placed Moka Jumbie.

    Calumet Farm paid $115,000 for Hip No 195, a son of Lemon Drop Kid also consigned by Taylor Made. The bay colt is out of You Hear Us Coming, by Stormy Atlantic, a half-sister to graded stakes-placed stakes- winner Quiet Meadow.

    Hip No. 153, a son of Kantharos consigned by Summerfield, was sold to Tracy Farmer for $100,000. The chestnut colt is a half-brother to stakes-placed J Isle out of Orchid Isle, by Zamindar.

    For the day, 124 horses sold for $5,464,000, compared with 115 yearlings bringing $4,959,400 at the 2017 Selected Sale. The average price was $44,065, up 2.2% from the $43,425 of last year, while the median was $30,000, identical to last year’s figure. The buyback percentage was 33.3%; it was 33.9% a year ago. Nine horses sold for $100,000 or more compared with six a year ago.

    The sale continues Wednesday at noon with Hip No.’s 301 – 550 selling in the first of two Open sessions. 

Monday, October 8, 2018
Seminole Tribe pulling a fast one . . .


    There is no way to look at Amendment 3 as anything but an anti-gambling measure. 

    Yet, the main financial supporter - to the tune of nearly $20 million so far - is the Seminole Tribe of Florida. Yes, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, the same folks that we all know already conduct the largest casino gambling operation in the state and have for many years. In fact, the revenue from the Seminole Tribe’s Hard Rock Casino in Tampa - by itself - dwarfs the revenue of all the pari-mutuel facilities in Florida combined, meaning the billions that the Seminole Tribe makes from its six other casinos in Florida is just icing on its already gigantic cake.

    So, inquiring minds might ask: Why would Florida’s largest gambling company be supporting an anti-gambling constitutional amendment?

    The answer to this question is easy: It is a universal truism that no one is more vehemently opposed to any expansion of gambling than those already in the gambling business. Here, the Seminole Tribe, through the clever wording of Amendment 3, has dealt with its hypocritical stance on gambling by specifically EXEMPTING itself from all of the amendment's anti-gambling provisions. As one of the creators of Amendment 3, this was rather easy for the Seminole Tribe to accomplish.

    Since Amendment 3’s anti-gambling provisions were intentionally designed by the Seminole Tribe to apply ONLY to the state’s pari-mutuel facilities, while leaving the Seminole Tribes’ enormous gambling empire intact, the most obvious impact from the adoption of Amendment 3 is that it will perpetuate the monopoly the Seminole Tribe already has on gambling in Florida. In fact, it is not a stretch to say that the Seminole Tribe already has it ALL, and now it wants even more.

    More importantly to anyone involved in Florida’s once prospering thoroughbred industry, if Amendment 3 passes, the industry’s current downward spiral will become a death spiral. Just look at California, another state where gambling is 100% controlled by Indian tribes. Within the last few years, Hollywood Park and Bay Meadows were permanently closed, and Golden Gate Fields is on a death watch. Why is that? Because the California tribes, with their millions (or billions) in campaign contributions, have blocked the race tracks from ever receiving a slot machine license. This, in turn, has caused the tracks to be unable to compete with California’s many Indian casinos.

    If this sounds familiar, there is a reason for it: Exactly what has happened in California has started to happen in Florida. We have already lost Hialeah Park as a thoroughbred track because it couldn’t compete, and now Calder has announced it will no longer conduct thoroughbred racing after 2020.

    We can't let what happened to thoroughbred racing in California happen in Florida.

    While Amendment 3 may be cleverly worded to make it sound both pro-citizen and pro-democratic, in reality it’s just the opposite. Amendment 3 is simply another special interest CON JOB - the same as the bogus Solar Energy Amendment of 2016 that was soundly defeated once the voters figured out that only the big power companies, i.e., FP&L, Florida Power and Duke Energy, benefited from the amendment’s adoption, and not the citizens as the pro-Solar amendment propaganda asserted.

    As with the Solar scam, one can search all the pro-Amendment 3 propaganda and not find any reference to the fact that one of the amendment's sponsors and primary supporters (to the tune of nearly $20 million), is Florida’s largest and most profitable casino operator, the Seminole Tribe of Florida. 

    Amendment 3 is totally misleading and hypocritical, yet very typical of the way sponsors of scam amendments like this one try to trick the voters.

    If Amendment 3 is adopted, the Seminole Tribe and its 4,000 multimillionaire members will become even richer - while everyone associated with the billion-dollar thoroughbred industry will be obliterated.

    Amendment 3 is nothing but a well-funded, anti-competitive CON JOB. Save the thoroughbred horse racing industry in Florida by voting NO on Amendment 3.